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  Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?


Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies?

Over the past 10 years, countries in Central and Eastern Europe and the CIS have undertaken significant reforms as part of their transition to a market-based economy. The spread of corruption has been an unwelcome but not wholly unexpected side-effect of this process: corruption often thrives in moments of radical economic transition and social change, where laws and mores are in flux, and new opportunities open up for illicit rent seeking.

Much has been done to undertake anti-corruption reforms by national governments and in the framework of regional initiatives or international instruments. As a result, corruption is in retreat in some areas. In others it is simply becoming more sophisticated and evasive.

The need to build coalitions and capitalise on lessons learned by others is urgent and can save scarce resources.

Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?


What is the Anti-Corruption Network?

The Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies (ACN) is a regional anti-corruption initiative that was established in 1998 by national governments, civil society organisations, and international donor agencies to promote knowledge sharing, donor co-ordination and policy dialogue in the transition economies in Central, Eastern, and South Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States.

The main objective of the ACN is to assist the participating countries to strengthen their capacity to tackle anti-corruption reform and to move closer to international standards.

Countries covered by the Network include: Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, the Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Slovenia, Serbia and Ukraine.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) hosts the Network Secretariat within its Anti-Corruption Division. The Anti-Corruption Division serves as the focal point for the OECD's work in the area of fight against bribery in international business. The Anti-Corruption Division is supporting the monitoring of the implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention and outreach to non-member countries.

Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?


What are the Network's Primary Activities?

The Network operates through Annual Meetings, topical projects and sub-regional initiatives. It exposes participating countries to inter-governmental co-operation, self-analysis, collaboration and peer review and helps to identify priority areas for remedial action by governments, donors and civil society.

The Network has helped to launch several sub-regional initiatives such as the Baltic Anti-Corruption Initiative/BACI and the new Istanbul Action Plan for seven Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union. The Network represents the OECD at the Stability Pact Anti-Corruption Initiative and co-ordinates with other regional initiatives, notably with the OECD/ADB Asia-Pacific Initiative.

The Network and its activities are financed by voluntary contributions and in-kind contributions of the OECD and participating agencies. Main donors of the Network in 1998 - 2004 are the United States and the Switzerland.

Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?


How does the Network Communicate?

The Network's communicates primarily by electronic means, operating a bilingual (English/Russian) website. The Network Secretariat provides support for meetings, technical assisstance projects, research and ad hoc networking.

The Network's website aims to facilitate networking and access to relevant laws and other policy resources in the field of anti-corruption. Its features include an extensive contacts database, a project database of ongoing and planned anti-corruption projects, and legal resources centres in the Network's primary areas of activity. The website's interactive "librarian" function allows users to search for documents not currently on the website.

Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?


Who can join?

The Network's activities are open in principle to all interested government representatives, civil society organisations, donor agencies, and international organisations. Participation in Network activities presumes a readiness to contribute, however, in either financial or knowledge-sharing terms.

Why an Anti-Corruption Network for Transition Economies? | What is the Anti-Corruption Network? | What are the Network's Primary Activities?  | How does the Network Communicate? | Who can join?

 
     
 
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The information on this site is subject to a disclaimer
2001 Anti-Corruption Division OECD